We are Social Futurists, which means that we believe in Positive Social Change Through Technology.

The fundamental problem with modern protest movements is that they effectively beg for crumbs from the master’s table, rather than directly taking control of the situation to do what must be done. When the rich and powerful are busily and systematically poisoning our societies and world, while simultaneously robbing us of any way to protect our loved ones from the consequences, then it is time to stop asking their permission for anything.

We must start with ourselves. Protect and support ourselves, and those who depend on us. That means creating small groups whose priority is to support themselves and each other, to work together as micro-communities; and for those micro-communities to form into larger cooperative networks when specific things need to be done. Organized in that way, we can dismantle our current individual vulnerability and dependence on status-quo institutions, replacing it with autonomy, dignity, and an ability to rapidly cooperate en masse when we see opportunities for positive change on a larger scale.


Z5 (not to be confused with the related “Zero State” or “ZS”) is a simple acronym for the Social Futurist approach to effecting positive change, now:

Z = ZERO centralized leadership.

Natural leadership skills – and the initiative to apply them – are good and helpful things, but we do not need or want centralized charismatic leadership of our movement. Status quo institutions can stop a person, or whole groups of people, but they cannot stop us all through force alone, if we act in a decentralized manner.

Instead of charismatic, centralized leadership, we have a set of Principles which all Social Futurists agree to and work toward. We are all “singing from the same hymn sheet”, and thus able to coordinate our actions in exactly the same way that animals do in nature; i.e. without any kind of explicit communication between different Social Futurist groups being necessary.


Each Social Futurist must be part of at least one explicit group of five people (or organizations) they actively support, and expect support from in turn. To give an idea of how much support we are talking about, at least ten percent of your time, money, and other resources should go toward ensuring a better quality of life for those in your “Five”. This “10% rule” or “tithe” is just a rule of thumb, but the critical point is that if you’re not doing at least that much, in some way, then you’re not really doing anything of consequence at all and are part of the problem.

Fives overlap, because your list of five people (including yourself) probably isn’t quite the same as everybody else in your Five has… although we do know that your Five, and the Five of someone else in it will have at least one pair of names in common; i.e. each other.

For example, imagine a Five containing (yourself plus) Sally, Bob, Mary and Pat. You are listed in every one of those people’s Five, and maybe some of the others list each other directly (rather than just via you). Fives are like bubbles which touch other bubbles at exactly four surfaces.

Of course you can support as many people as you like, in any way you like, but for the sake of encouraging organizational growth and strength there can only be five names in each person’s Five; i.e. four entities you are committed to supporting, plus yourself.

The names in your Five could be groups, families or even larger organizations rather than individuals – that’s up to you – but they must at minimum be willing, ready, and able to actively support a Five of their own (including you), and to do so in a reliable, effective, and Principled manner.

Finally and in some ways most importantly, when a member of your Five calls on you for help, then you must answer that call as best you can. By helping that person, you are helping yourself and your loved ones, and helping us all in the longer term.